2018


2018-10: K. Vassilakis, O. Charalampakos, G. Glykokokalos, P. Kontokalou, M. Kalogiannakis, and N. Vidakis, “Learning by playing: An LBG for the Fortification Gates of the Venetian walls of the city of Heraklion,” EAI Endorsed Transactions on Creative Technologies, vol. 5, no. 16, p. 156773, Oct. 2018. DOI: 10.4108/eai.7-3-2019.156773; https://dx.doi.org/10.4108/eai.7-3-2019.156773

Abstract: Games in education have always been a tool for increasing motivation and interest of learners. We present Location-Based Games (LBG) as a tool to involve and motivate students in the learning process. LBGs require the player to move around in order to complete a task and proceed in the storyline and use localization technology such as Global Positioning System (GPS). LBGs are built on physical worlds, while virtual world augmentations enable the interaction of physical and other related (cultural, historical etc.) data with the player. Augmented reality (AR) is used to provide this extra layer with 3D objects, avatars and animations for player’s interaction. In our paper we present a history learning LBG with the use of augmented reality in the form of 3D objects. We explore the concept, of having both virtual and physical worlds available within the same visual display environment.


2018-10: S. Papadakis, M. Kalogiannakis, E. Sifaki, and N. Vidakis, “Evaluating Moodle use via Smart Mobile Phones. A case study in a Greek University,” EAI Endorsed Transactions on Creative Technologies, vol. 5, no. 16, p. 156382, Oct. 2018. DOI: 10.4108/eai.10-4-2018.156382; http://dx.doi.org/10.4108/eai.10-4-2018.156382

Abstract: The use of learning management systems (LMS) has grown considerably in universities around the world. LMSs can offer a great variety of channels and workspaces to facilitate information sharing and communication among participants in a course. One of the most commonly used is Moodle, a free learning management system enabling the creation of powerful, flexible and engaging online courses and experiences. A course can consist of a number of lessons. Each lesson consists of reading materials; activities such as quizzes, tests, surveys, and projects; and social elements that encourage interaction and group work among students. This study investigated how often students used a mobile phone to access various activities on Moodle. The students’ point of view is important since they are the main users of the offered teaching technique and can cooperate in implementing and improving an e-course as a very important stakeholder in the e-learning process. A survey on self-reported usage was filled by 122 university students in a course offered by the faculty of Preschool Education at the University of Crete. Follow-up interviews were conducted to solicit students’ perceptions on mobile access to Moodle and the underlying reasons. The results show significant differences in students’ usage of various Moodle activities via mobile phones. Students’ responses also suggest that Moodle is used merely as an electronic document repository and not as an effective learning tool due to the limitations of mobile access on usability and reliability.



 

2017


2017-09: N. Vidakis, “A Multimodal Interaction Framework for Blended Learning,” EAI Endorsed Transactions on Creative Technologies, vol. 4, no. 10, p. 153057, Sep. 2017. DOI: 10.4108/eai.4-9-2017.153057; http://dx.doi.org/10.4108/eai.4-9-2017.153057 

Abstract: Humans interact with each other by utilizing the five basic senses as input modalities, whereas sounds, gestures, facial expressions etc. are utilized as output modalities. Multimodal interaction is also used between humans and their surrounding environment, although enhanced with further senses such as equilibrioception and the sense of balance. Computer interfaces that are considered as a different environment that human can interact with, lack of input and output amalgamation in order to provide a close to natural interaction. Multimodal human-computer interaction has sought to provide alternative means of communication with an application, which will be more natural than the traditional “windows, icons, menus, pointer” (WIMP) style. Despite the great amount of devices in existence, most applications make use of a very limited set of modalities, most notably speech and touch. This paper describes a multimodal framework enabling deployment of a vast variety of modalities, tailored appropriately for use in blended learning environment and introduces a unified and effective framework for multimodal interaction called COALS.


2017-06: G. Kalliatakis, A. Stergiou, and N. Vidakis, “Conceiving Human Interaction by Visualising Depth Data of Head Pose Changes and Emotion Recognition via Facial Expressions,” Computers, vol. 6, no. 3, p. 25, Jul. 2017. DOI: 10.3390/computers6030025; https://doi.org/10.3390/computers6030025

Abstract: Affective computing in general and human activity and intention analysis in particular comprise a rapidly-growing field of research. Head pose and emotion changes present serious challenges when applied to player’s training and ludology experience in serious games, or analysis of customer satisfaction regarding broadcast and web services, or monitoring a driver’s attention. Given the increasing prominence and utility of depth sensors, it is now feasible to perform large-scale collection of three-dimensional (3D) data for subsequent analysis. Discriminative random regression forests were selected in order to rapidly and accurately estimate head pose changes in an unconstrained environment. In order to complete the secondary process of recognising four universal dominant facial expressions (happiness, anger, sadness and surprise), emotion recognition via facial expressions (ERFE) was adopted. After that, a lightweight data exchange format (JavaScript Object Notation (JSON)) is employed, in order to manipulate the data extracted from the two aforementioned settings. Motivated by the need to generate comprehensible visual representations from different sets of data, in this paper, we introduce a system capable of monitoring human activity through head pose and emotion changes, utilising an affordable 3D sensing technology (Microsoft Kinect sensor).



 

2016


Vidakis Nikolaos, A Multimodal Interaction Framework for Blended Learning, EAI Endorsed Transactions on Creative Technologies http://eai.eu/transaction/creative-technologies, Special Issue on: ArtsIT & DLI 2016, Springer, Publication date November 2016. (accepted & in print)


 

2014


E. Christinaki, N. Vidakis, and G. Triantafyllidis, “A novel educational game for teaching emotion identification skills to preschoolers with autism diagnosis,” Computer Science and Information Systems, vol. 11, no. 2, pp. 723–743, 2014. DOI: 10.2298/CSIS140215039C; https://doi.org/10.2298/CSIS140215039C
 
Abstract: Emotion recognition is essential in human communication and social interaction. Children with autism have been reported to exhibit deficits in understanding and expressing emotions. Those deficits seem to be rather permanent so intervention tools for improving those impairments are desirable. Educational interventions for teaching emotion recognition should occur as early as possible. It is argued that Serious Games can be very effective in the areas of therapy and education for children with autism. However, those computer interventions require considerable skills for interaction. Before the age of 6, most children with autism do not have such basic motor skills in order to manipulate a mouse or a keyboard. Our approach takes account of the specific characteristics of preschoolers with autism and their physical inabilities. By creating an educational computer game, which provides physical interaction with natural user interface (NUI), we aim to support early intervention and to enhance emotion recognition skills.


 

2013


2013-04: G. Triantafyllidis, M. Dimitriou, T. Kounalakis, and N. Vidakis, “Detection and Classification of Multiple Objects using an RGB-D Sensor and Linear Spatial Pyramid Matching,” ELCVIA Electronic Letters on Computer Vision and Image Analysis, vol. 12, no. 2, p. 78, Apr. 2013. DOI: 10.5565/rev/elcvia.523; https://doi.org/10.5565/rev/elcvia.523
 
Abstract: This paper presents a complete system for multiple object detection and classification in a 3D scene using an RGB-D sensor such as the Microsoft Kinect sensor. Successful multiple object detection and classification are crucial features in many 3D computer vision applications. The main goal is making machines see and understand objects like humans do. To this goal, the new RGB-D sensors can be utilized since they provide real-time depth map which can be used along with the RGB images for our tasks. In our system we employ effective depth map processing techniques, along with edge detection, connected components detection and filtering approaches, in order to design a complete image processing algorithm for efficient object detection of multiple individual objects in a single scene, even in complex scenes with many objects. Besides, we apply the Linear Spatial Pyramid Matching (LSPM) [1] method proposed by Jianchao Yang et al for the efficient classification of the detected objects. Experimental results are presented for both detection and classification, showing the efficiency of the proposed design.


 

2012


2012-03: N. Vidakis, D. Akoumianakis, and C. Katimeri, “Articulating a 3D metaphor for displaying and exploring vacation packages,” 3D Research, vol. 3, no. 1, Mar. 2012. DOI: 10.1007/3DRes.01(2012)6; https://doi.org/10.1007/3DRes.01(2012)6
 
Abstract: This paper presents a 3DTV application that enables displaying and exploration of thematic information in a 3D environment using the book and carousel metaphor. To achieve its goal the system initially deposits all necessary information to be displayed in an XML data repository. The stored data is then displayed through dynamically created 3D artifacts that build up a 3D carousel with hanging 3D books and flipping 3D pages separated into different sections. The user can interact and explore the displayed information through a toolbar which gives him the ability to activate the carousel, to flip pages and section of pages and to zoom on information.


 

2011


2011-01: D. Akoumianakis, N. Vidakis, A. Akrivos, G. Milolidakis, D. Kotsalis, and G. Vellis, “Building ‘Flexible’ vacation packages using collaborative assembly toolkits and dynamic packaging: The Case Study of the eKoNES,” Journal of Vacation Marketing, vol. 17, no. 1, pp. 17–30, Jan. 2011. DOI: 10.1177/1356766710391132; https://doi.org/10.1177/1356766710391132
 
Abstract: The paper motivates and presents an approach for assembling innovative information-based products and services by virtual cross-organization communities of practice. Using a case study on assembling vacation packages, we describe the cross-organizational virtual partnership, the mechanics allowing it to operate as a virtual community of practice and how collective intelligence of the members is appropriated to ensemble innovative information-based products for tourists. The results provide useful insights into innovating through virtual networking as well as the ICT tools that may be used to foster value-creating networks of practice in boundary spanning domains.


2011-01: D. Akoumianakis et al., “Transformable boundary artifacts for knowledge-based work in cross-organization virtual communities spaces,” IDT, vol. 5, no. 1, pp. 65–82, Jan. 2011. DOI: 10.3233/IDT-2011-0098; https://doi.org/10.3233/IDT-2011-0098
 
Abstract: The paper elaborates on the design and use of cross-organization virtual community spaces facilitating knowledge-based collaborative engagement in the practice of a boundary spanning alliance. Our approach builds upon the concept of transformable boundary artifacts and advances a perspective upon their design as first class objects in common information spaces. Using a case study on vacation package assembly, we identify offline elements of practice and discuss the components of an interaction vocabulary devised to facilitate their transformable interactive embodiment. Transformations allow boundary artifacts to exhibit plasticity as they transcend different social worlds and computing contexts within the cross-organization virtual community space, which in turn, forms the virtuality through which members make sense of collaborative work and contribute to a shared mission. Such contributions are materialized through recurrent interactions with different versions of boundary artifacts, which remain consistent and synchronized at all times.


 

1996


N. Vidakis, C. Stary, Algorithmic Support for Model Integration in TADEUS, in: Journal of Computing and Information, Vol. 2, No. 1, 1996, pp. 1093-1106. Special Issue: Proceedings of Eighth International Conference of Computing and Information (ICCI’96), University of Waterloo, Waterloo, Ontario, Canada, June 19-22, 1996.

2019


2019-04: N. Vidakis, K.A. Barianos, A.M. Trampas, St. Papadakis, M. Kalogiannakis, K. Vassilakis, “Generating Education in-Game Data: The Case of an Ancient Theatre Serious Game” in Proceedings of the 11th International Conference on Computer Supported Education – CSEDU 2019, May 2019, pp. 36-43.

Abstract: Learning Analytics have become an indispensable element of education, as digital mediums are increasingly used within formal and informal education. Integrating specifications for learning analytics in non-traditional educational mediums, such as serious games, has not yet reached the level of development necessary to fulfil their potential. Though much research has been conducted on the issue of managing and extracting value from learning analytics, the importance of specifications, methods and decisions for the initial creation of such data has been somewhat overlooked. To this end, we have developed a custom library that implements the Experience API specification within the Unity 3D game engine. In this paper, we present this library, as well as a representative scenario illustrating the procedure of generating and recording data. Through this work we aim to expand the reach of learning analytics into serious games, facilitate the generation of such data in commercially popular development tools and identify significant events, with educational value, to be recorded.



 

2018


N. Vidakis, M. A. Lasithiotakis, and E. Karapidakis, “Recodify,” in Proceedings of the 22nd Pan-Hellenic Conference on Informatics – PCI ’18, 2018. DOI: 10.1145/3291533.3291554; https://doi.org/10.1145/3291533.3291554

Abstract: Ecological – environmental disturbances are the agitations in the earth’s biosphere that human activities are responsible for, mainly after the industrial evolution. Environmental engineers supported by the rapid Information and Communication Technology revolution are trying to develop eco-friendly devices and systems to suspend global environmental hazard. With the use of a Wireless Sensor Network and an Internet of Things implementation we present a standalone environmental monitoring embedded system, namely Recodify, that can measure, store and analyze various environmental variables such as Temperature, Humidity, Luminance, Sound, Carbon Monoxide and Ozone levels as well as Current consumption. Recodify has a build in motion detection and a relay module that gives user the ability to remote control connected appliances either manually or automatically. It can be controlled with the use of the Recodify software which comes in the form of a Web based application that provides central management abilities. It supports continuous monitoring with real-time data and graphs. Recodify pursues to determine, describe and record ambient space’s conditions and provide appropriate intervention means to enhance environmental conditions.


2018-10: N. Vidakis, K. A. Barianos, G. Xanthopoulos, A, Stamatakis, “Cultural Inheritance Educational Environment: The Ancient Theatre Game ThimelEdu” in European Conference on Games Based Learning, Oct. 2018, pp. 730-739.

Abstract: Constant evolution of game engines and the growing maturity of Game Based Learning have broadened the benefits of virtual worlds and augmented the value of exploratory and experiential learning, in the educational process. Virtual worlds act as a ludic environment for students, create new opportunities and offer alternatives to traditional, literal study. They introduce interactivity and playfulness in the learning process which acts as an essential trigger for students. According to Discovery Learning, a technique based on constructivism, the unconstrained exploration and navigation within virtual worlds is fundamental for the learning process. In this context, we developed an interactive educational game, henceforth ThimelEdu, using the Unity game engine, the Blender 3D creation suite and the IOLAOS Cloud Ecosystem. ThimelEdu attempts to create a realistic virtual word to act as a complementary tool to ancient theatre studies. In this pursuit, 3D artefacts that represent constructional components of an ancient theatre, were implemented based on bibliographic references, reconstructing a virtual historical site. Most of the artefacts are interactive and carry information that can be retrieved by learners as a part of the explorative learning experience. Thus, the potential knowledge is concealed within the interactive artefacts of the virtual world. It can be discovered during the virtual expedition while building a learning experience unique to the individual. The learning process is further ensured and assessed through online interactive quizzes and questionnaires while exploring the ThimelEdu virtual word. Most importantly, trainees can perform knowledge assessment based on virtual artefacts interaction, in-game quizzes and questionnaires without the intervention of teachers. Game personalization is achieved by a specific module that automatically customizes the game depending on who the player is and according to his player profile retrieved from IOLAOS. Furthermore, ThimelEdu provides ad-hoc real time game customization for better game experience, enhanced educational results and improved playfulness.



 

2017


S. Papadakis, M. Kalogiannakis, E. Sifaki, and N. Vidakis, “Access Moodle Using Smart Mobile Phones. A Case Study in a Greek University,” in Lecture Notes of the Institute for Computer Sciences, Social Informatics and Telecommunications Engineering, Springer International Publishing, 2018, pp. 376–385. DOI: 10.1007/978-3-319-76908-0_36; https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-76908-0_36

Abstract: The use of learning management systems (LMS) has grown considerably in universities around the world. This study investigated how often students used a mobile phone to access various activities on Moodle. The students’ point of view is important since they are the main users of the offered teaching technique and can cooperate in implementing and improving an e-course as a very important stakeholder in the e-learning process. A survey on self-reported usage was filled by 122 university students in a course offered by the faculty of Preschool Education at the University of Crete. Follow-up interviews were conducted to solicit students’ perceptions on mobile access to Moodle and the underlying reasons. The results show significant differences in students’ usage of various Moodle activities via mobile phones. Students’ responses also suggest that Moodle is used merely as an electronic document repository and not as an effective learning tool due to the limitations of mobile access on usability and reliability.


N. Vidakis, M. Skalidaki, K. Konstantoulakis, L. Kalikakis, M. Kalogiannakis, and K. Vassilakis, “Training the Mind: The GARDINER Platform,” in Lecture Notes of the Institute for Computer Sciences, Social Informatics and Telecommunications Engineering, Springer International Publishing, 2018, pp. 347–356. DOI: 10.1007/978-3-319-76908-0_33; https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-76908-0_33

Abstract: Recent research has shown that the systematic involvement of a person with games, which are designated to exercise memory and concentration, contributes to the long-term preservation of the human memory and therefore leads to the prevention of dementia. Our work seeks to capitalize on the positive effects of serious games’ use in a variety of ways. In particular, we provide insights into the design and development process of two serious games dedicated to being used by elderly people with dementia. In their context, we also elaborate on the basic elements of a novel web-oriented platform, namely GARDINER (Games plAtform foR minD traIning aNd mEmory peRk), aimed at making available various memory games which may have been crafted by various sources. Finally, some empirical data derived from the use of our platform and games in practice is provided.


K. Vassilakis, J. Makridis, M. A. Lasithiotakis, M. Kalogiannakis, and N. Vidakis, “Facilitating Learning in Isolated Places Through an Autonomous LMS,” in Lecture Notes of the Institute for Computer Sciences, Social Informatics and Telecommunications Engineering, Springer International Publishing, 2018, pp. 357–365. DOI: 10.1007/978-3-319-76908-0_34; https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-76908-0_34

Abstract: Current research argues that eLearning and mobile learning are forms of learning that could take place outside the classroom and the traditional learning environments. In addition, recent advancement in technology and increased use of smart devices permit students to carry with them a kind of portable smart device. Inevitably, sooner or later, these devices will become integral educational tools, such as pencils and books, while learning outside the classroom will continue to gain popularity as another form of learning. Ubiquitous learning aims to stimulate the wide use of ICT in Education and the enactment of autonomous digital resources for Outdoor learning. Technology could provide innovative ways of conducting outdoor courses, encompassing knowledge and physical activity. This paper presents the eClass-Pi system that facilitates outside the classroom eLearning and m-learning educational processes. It provides all the functionalities of a typical Learning Management Systems as well as synchronous and asynchronous teaching, portability and energy autonomy.


K. Vassilakis, O. Charalampakos, G. Glykokokalos, P. Kontokalou, M. Kalogiannakis, and N. Vidakis, “Learning History Through Location-Based Games: The Fortification Gates of the Venetian Walls of the City of Heraklion,” in Lecture Notes of the Institute for Computer Sciences, Social Informatics and Telecommunications Engineering, Springer International Publishing, 2018, pp. 510–519. DOI: 10.1007/978-3-319-76908-0_49; https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-76908-0_49

Abstract: Games in education have always been a tool for increasing motivation and interest of learners. We present Location-Based Games (LBG) as a tool to involve and motivate students in the learning process. LBGs require the player to move around in order to complete a task and proceed in the storyline and use localization technology such as Global Positioning System (GPS). LBGs are built on physical worlds, while virtual world augmentations enable the interaction of physical and other related (cultural, historical etc.) data with the player. Augmented reality (AR) is used to provide this extra layer with 3D objects, avatars and animations for player’s interaction. In our paper we present a history learning LBG with the use of augmented reality in the form of 3D objects. We explore the concept, of having both virtual and physical worlds available within the same visual display environment.



 

2016


G. Kalliatakis, N. Vidakis, and G. Triantafyllidis, “Web-based visualisation of head pose and facial expressions changes: Monitoring human activity using depth data,” in 2016 8th Computer Science and Electronic Engineering (CEEC), 2016. DOI: 10.1109/CEEC.2016.7835887; https://doi.org/10.1109/CEEC.2016.7835887

Abstract: Despite significant recent advances in the field of head pose estimation and facial expression recognition, raising the cognitive level when analysing human activity presents serious challenges to current concepts. Motivated by the need of generating comprehensible visual representations from different sets of data, we introduce a system capable of monitoring human activity through head pose and facial expression changes, utilising an affordable 3D sensing technology (Microsoft Kinect sensor). An approach build on discriminative random regression forests was selected in order to rapidly and accurately estimate head pose changes in unconstrained environment. In order to complete the secondary process of recognising four universal dominant facial expressions (happiness, anger, sadness and surprise), emotion recognition via facial expressions (ERFE) was adopted. After that, a lightweight data exchange format (JavaScript Object Notation-JSON) is employed, in order to manipulate the data extracted from the two aforementioned settings. Such mechanism can yield a platform for objective and effortless assessment of human activity within the context of serious gaming and human-computer interaction.


G. Kavalakis, N. Vidakis, and G. Triantafyllidis, “Emotion Index of Cover Song Music Video Clips Based on Facial Expression Recognition,” in Lecture Notes of the Institute for Computer Sciences, Social Informatics and Telecommunications Engineering, Springer International Publishing, 2017, pp. 248–255. DOI: 10.1007/978-3-319-55834-9_29; https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-55834-9_29

Abstract: This paper presents a scheme of creating an emotion index of cover song music video clips by recognizing and classifying facial expressions of the artist in the video. More specifically, it fuses effective and robust algorithms which are employed for expression recognition, along with the use of a neural network system using the features extracted by the SIFT algorithm. Also we support the need of this fusion of different expression recognition algorithms, because of the way that emotions are linked to facial expressions in music video clips.


N. Vidakis, K. Konstantinos, and G. Triantafyllidis, “A Multimodal Interaction Framework for Blended Learning,” in Lecture Notes of the Institute for Computer Sciences, Social Informatics and Telecommunications Engineering, Springer International Publishing, 2017, pp. 205–211. DOI: 10.1007/978-3-319-55834-9_24; https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-55834-9_24

Abstract: Humans interact with each other by utilizing the five basic senses as input modalities, whereas sounds, gestures, facial expressions etc. are utilized as output modalities. Multimodal interaction is also used between humans and their surrounding environment, although enhanced with further senses such as equilibrioception and the sense of balance. Computer interfaces that are considered as a different environment that human can interact with, lack of input and output amalgamation in order to provide a close to natural interaction. Multimodal human-computer interaction has sought to provide alternative means of communication with an application, which will be more natural than the traditional “windows, icons, menus, pointer” (WIMP) style. Despite the great amount of devices in existence, most applications make use of a very limited set of modalities, most notably speech and touch. This paper describes a multimodal framework enabling deployment of a vast variety of modalities, tailored appropriately for use in blended learning environment.



 

2015


G. Kalliatakis, G. Triantafyllidis, and N. Vidakis, “Head pose 3D data web-based visualization,” in Proceedings of the 20th International Conference on 3D Web Technology – Web3D ’15, 2015. DOI: 10.1145/2775292.2778304; https://doi.org/10.1145/2775292.2778304

Abstract: An approach build on discriminative random regression forests was followed in order to achieve fast, accurate and reliable estimation of head pose in uncontrolled environment. Data representing the changes of a person’s head direction, concerning two Degrees of Freedom (DOF), pitch and yaw, are collected and stored adopting a lightweight data exchange format (JavaScript Object Notation-JSON). After that, a web visualization approach is proposed in order to improve the understanding and the analysis of the captured 3D data.


2015-10: N. Vidakis, E. Efthymios, K. Kalafatis, P. Varahalamas, G. Triantafyllidis, “Conceiling Education Into Games” in Proceedings of the 9th European Conference on Games Based Learning, Academic Conferences International Limited Oct. 2015, pp. 554-563.


N. Vidakis, E. Syntychakis, K. Kalafatis, E. Christinaki, and G. Triantafyllidis, “Ludic Educational Game Creation Tool: Teaching Schoolers Road Safety,” in Universal Access in Human-Computer Interaction. Access to Learning, Health and Well-Being, Springer International Publishing, 2015, pp. 565–576. DOI: 10.1007/978-3-319-20684-4_55; https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-20684-4_55

Abstract: This paper presents initial findings and ongoing work of the game creation tool, a core component of the IOLAOS(IOLAOS in ancient Greece was a divine hero famed for helping with some of Heracles’s labors.) platform, a general open authorable framework for educational and training games. The game creation tool features a web editor, where the game narrative can be manipulated, according to specific needs. Moreover, this tool is applied for creating an educational game according to a reference scenario namely teaching schoolers road safety. A ludic approach is used both in game creation and play. Helping children staying safe and preventing serious injury on the roads is crucial. In this context, this work presents an augmented version of the IOLAOS architecture including an enhanced game creation tool and a new multimodality module. In addition presents a case study for creating educational games for teaching road safety, by employing ludic interfaces for both the game creator and the game player, as well as ludic game design.


D. Akoumianakis, N. Karadimitriou, G. Ktistakis, C. Michailidis, E. Syntychakis, G. Vellis, N. Vidakis, G. Vlachakis, “Designing digital artifacts as transient assemblies with different digital materialities,” in Proceedings of the 19th Panhellenic Conference on Informatics – PCI ’15, 2015. DOI: 10.1145/2801948.2801968; https://doi.org/10.1145/2801948.2801968

Abstract: This paper is inspired by the concept of digital metamaterials and advances a proposal for a genre of digital artifacts that exhibit the transformative capacity to transcend technical boundaries in digital ecosystems. In terms of theoretical footing, our approach is ground on the conception of ‘software as material’ with intrinsic properties such as interactivity, editability, openness and reprogrammability, distributedness and emergence. We claim that as these properties are purposefully inscribed into digital artifacts, the latter become transient assemblies capable of exhibiting different digital materialities. To illustrate the concepts, the paper reflects upon a case study featuring the use of digital composites in boundary spanning virtual collaboration in organic farming.



 

2014


N. Skordilis, N. Vidakis, G. Triantafyllidis, L. Nalpantidis, “Depth camera driven mobile robot for human localization and following” in 2nd AAU Workshop on Robotics, 2014.

Abstract: In this paper the design and the development of a mobile robot able to locate and then follow a human target is described. Both the integration of the required mechatronics components and the development of appropriate software are covered. The main sensor of the developed mobile robot is an RGB-D camera. This sensor is usually combined with the appropriate middleware that can detect humans in a scene and also provide the position of the detected human in the 3D space. One of the cues this middleware’s algorithms are using to detect humans is motion, thus resulting in many false detections when applied to data captured by a mobile platform. This work proposes the use of a special-tailored feed forward neural network to further process the initial detections, identifying and rejecting most false positives. Experimental results based on two self-captured data sets show the improved detection rate of our two-stage human detector, as well as the efficient real-time performance of the proposed system for human localization and following.


N. Vidakis, E. Christinaki, I. Serafimidis, and G. Triantafyllidis, “Combining Ludology and Narratology in an Open Authorable Framework for Educational Games for Children: the Scenario of Teaching Preschoolers with Autism Diagnosis,” in Lecture Notes in Computer Science, Springer International Publishing, 2014, pp. 626–636. DOI: 10.1007/978-3-319-07440-5_57; https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-07440-5_57

Abstract: This paper presents the initial findings and the on-going work of IOLAOS project, a general open authorable framework for educational games for children. This framework features an editor, where the game narrative can be created or edited, according to specific needs. A ludic approach is also used both for the interface as well as for the game design. More specifically, by employing physical and natural user interface (NUI), we aim to achieve ludic interfaces. Moreover, by designing the educational game with playful elements, we follow a ludic design. This framework is then applied for the scenario of teaching preschoolers with autism diagnosis. Children with autism have been reported to exhibit deficits in the recognition of affective expressions and the perception of emotions. With the appropriate intervention, elimination of those deficits can be achieved. Interventions are proposed to start as early as possible. Computer-based programs have been widely used with success to teach people with autism to recognize emotions. However, those computer interventions require considerable skills for interaction. Such abilities are beyond very young children with autism as most probably they don’t have the skills to interact with computers. In this context, our approach with the suggested framework employs a ludic interface based on NUI, a ludic game design and takes account of the specific characteristics of preschoolers with autism diagnosis and their physical abilities for customizing accordingly the narrative of the game.



 

2013


N. Vidakis et al., “Multimodal desktop interaction: The face – object – gesture – voice example,” in 2013 18th International Conference on Digital Signal Processing (DSP), 2013. DOI: 10.1109/ICDSP.2013.6622782; https://doi.org/10.1109/ICDSP.2013.6622782

Abstract: This paper presents a natural user interface system based on multimodal human computer interaction, which operates as an intermediate module between the user and the operating system. The aim of this work is to demonstrate a multimodal system which gives users the ability to interact with desktop applications using face, objects, voice and gestures. These human behaviors constitute the input qualifiers to the system. Microsoft Kinect multi-sensor was utilized as input device in order to succeed the natural user interaction, mainly due to the multimodal capabilities offered by this device. We demonstrate scenarios which contain all the functions and capabilities of our system from the perspective of natural user interaction.


E. Christinaki, N. Vidakis, and G. Triantafyllidis, “Facial expression recognition teaching to preschoolers with autism,” in Proceedings of the 6th Balkan Conference in Informatics on – BCI ’13, 2013. DOI: 10.1145/2490257.2490262; https://doi.org/10.1145/2490257.2490262

Abstract: The recognition of facial expressions is important for the perception of emotions. Understanding emotions is essential in human communication and social interaction. Children with autism have been reported to exhibit deficits in the recognition of affective expressions. Their difficulties in understanding and expressing emotions lead to inappropriate behavior derived from their inability to interact adequately with other people. Those deficits seem to be rather permanent in individuals with autism so intervention tools for improving those impairments are desirable. Educational interventions for teaching emotion recognition from facial expressions should occur as early as possible in order to be successful and to have a positive effect. It is claimed that Serious Games can be very effective in the areas of therapy and education for children with autism. However, those computer interventions require considerable skills for interaction. Before the age of 6, most children with autism do not have such basic motor skills in order to manipulate a mouse or a keyboard. Our approach takes account of the specific characteristics of preschoolers with autism and their physical inabilities. By creating an educational computer game, which provides physical interaction by employing natural user interface (NUI), we aim to support early intervention and to foster facial expression learning.


E. Christinaki, G. Triantafyllidis, N. Vidakis, “A gesture-controlled serious game for teaching emotion recognition skills to preschoolers with autism”, in Foundations of Digital Games: The 8th International Conference on the Foundations of Digital Games, 2013, pp. 417-418.

Abstract: The recognition of facial expressions is important for the perception of emotions. Understanding emotions is essential in human communication and social interaction. Children with autism have been reported to exhibit deficits in the recognition of affective expressions. With the appropriate intervention, elimination of those deficits can be achieved. Interventions are proposed to start as early as possible. Computer-based programs have been widely used with success to teach people with autism to recognize emotions. However, those computer interventions require considerable skills for interaction. Such abilities are beyond very young children with autism as they have major restriction in their ability to interact with computers. Our approach takes account of the specific characteristics of preschoolers with autism and their physical inabilities. By creating an educational computer game which provides physical interaction, we aim to support early intervention and to foster emotion learning.



 

2012


N. Vidakis, M. Syntychakis, G. Triantafyllidis, and D. Akoumianakis, “Multimodal natural user interaction for multiple applications: The gesture — Voice example,” in 2012 International Conference on Telecommunications and Multimedia (TEMU), 2012. DOI: 10.1109/TEMU.2012.6294720; https://doi.org/10.1109/TEMU.2012.6294720

Abstract: In this paper we present a natural user interface system. The device utilized for achieving natural interaction is the MS-Kinect which provides RGB, depth & audio signal. Our system is based on the theory of multimodal interaction and provides the ability to the user to interact simultaneously with different applications using vocal commands and gesture in conjunction. The difference of our system from other similar efforts is that it uses a multimodal interaction approach to manipulate multi-applications by employing a generic container, which runs at the background and serves as an intermediate between multimodal input and active applications running on a computer. We describe the architecture of the system based on multimodal interaction and its representative example using two PC applications.


M. K. Demetriou, T. Kounalakis, N. Vidakis, and G. A. Triantafyllidis, “Fast 3D Scene Object Detection and Real Size Estimation using Microsoft Kinect Sensor,” in Signal Processing, Pattern Recognition and Applications / 779: Computer Graphics and Imaging, 2012. DOI: 10.2316/P.2012.779-026; https://doi.org/10.2316/P.2012.779-026

Abstract: This paper presents an efficient and fast system for object detection in a 3D scene using the capabilities of Microsoft Kinect sensor in depth map generation. Besides, the proposed method introduces a real size estimation of the detected objects. Successful 3D scene’s object detection and real size calculation are crucial features in computer vision to the goal of making machines that see objects like humans do. In our system we employ effective depth map processing techniques, along with edge detection, connected components detection and filtering approaches, in order to design a complete algorithm for efficient object detection and real size calculation, even in complex scenes with many objects. Experimental results on three different 3D scenes are presented, showing the efficiency of the proposed design.



 

2009


D. Akoumianakis et al., “Virtual Operations in Common Information Spaces: Boundary Objects and Practices,” in Leveraging Knowledge for Innovation in Collaborative Networks, Springer Berlin Heidelberg, 2009, pp. 207–216. DOI: 10.1007/978-3-642-04568-4_22; https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-642-04568-4_22

Abstract: The paper presents a field study aimed at identifying and analyzing the role of boundary artifacts in cross-organization virtual communities of practice (CoP). Our analysis is informed by a recent case study in vacation package assembly (VPA), which is defined as the distributed collective practice carried out by members of a boundary-spanning virtual alliance inhabiting a ‘common’ information space (CIS). The CIS forms the virtuality through which members of the alliance engage in coordinative actions on boundary artifacts. The CIS implements the facilities required for constructing, negotiating and reconstructing these boundary artifacts so as to assemble personalized regional vacation packages for tourists. The results lead to several conclusions on the design of CIS as computational host of virtual communities of practice.



 

2008


2008-02: D. Akoumianakis, N. Vidakis, G. Vellis, G. Milolidakis, D. Kotsalis, “Interaction scenarios in the ‘social’ experience factory: assembling collaborative artefacts through component reuse and social interaction” in Proceedings of the Third IASTED International Conference on Human Computer Interaction, Feb. 2008, pp. 267-272.

Abstract: This paper describes interaction scenarios in the context of community-based collaborative activities. We first present the notion of a ‘social’ experience factory (SEF) which underlies the conduct of collaborative work in the context of an electronic village of local interest on regional tourism. The SEF is biased towards building up experiences for reuse and facilitating the production of artefacts (information-based services) by assembling deposited ‘shared’ components. In its current formulation, the SEF implements techniques and tools for building visual domain-specific languages and constructing artefacts as instances of a corresponding family. The paper reports on the details of these techniques and illustrates their application in the construction, negotiation and tailoring of vacation packages in the domain of tourism.



 

2007


D. Akoumianakis, N. Vidakis, G. Vellis, G. Milolidakis, D. Kotsalis, “Experience-Based Social and Collaborative Performance in an’Electronic Village’of Local Interest: The EKONES Framework” in ICEIS (5), 2007, pp. 117-122.

Abstract: We present the baseline of a framework called eKoNEσ, for building electronic villages of local interest. An electronic village is considered as a virtual organization formed by representatives of different sectors who work together during a period of time to realize a common goal. We assume tight coupling between the virtual organization and a physical space to differentiate the electronic village of local interest from the notion of the global electronic village. In this context, the paper focuses on two primary issues, namely the stimulation and organization of collaborative work by virtual teams and the design of electronic artefacts which facilitate collaborative feedback and feedthrough in an exemplar case in the context of eKoNEσ;Tourism – a pilot electronic village on regional tourism.


D. Akoumianakis, D. Kotsalis, G. Vellis, G. Milolidakis, N. Vidakis, “Computer-supported informal learning in an Electronic village of local interest” in CBLIS Conference Proceedings 2007 Contemporary Perspective on new technologies in science and education, 2007.

Abstract: We present an approach and a collection of tools, which advance a perspective on learning, informed by sociological theory of ‘group stabilization’ and ‘situated action-reflection’. The former serves as a theoretical guide to reach consensus on the stages involved in computer-mediated learning in the context of on-line engineering communities and accordingly to inform the design of suitable information technology tools. The latter helps to establish an analytical foundation of learning through performing. The tools described offer an integrated mechanism for continued activity-oriented learning which helps learners compile shared representations of engineering problems and artefacts, while maintaining their own individual work practices, tool of preference and pace of working. Such shared representations provide the common ground for learners to perform common tasks and accomplish the learning objective.



 

2006


D. Akoumianakis, A. Katsis, and N. Vidakis, “Non-functional User Interface Requirements Notation (NfRn) for Modeling the Global Execution Context of Tasks,” in Task Models and Diagrams for Users Interface Design, Springer Berlin Heidelberg, pp. 259–274. DOI: 10.1007/978-3-540-70816-2_19; https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-540-70816-2_19

Abstract: This paper describes the rationale behind a user interface requirements management notation and a supporting tool suite. The notation is being developed to facilitate the design of interactions based on an account of non-functional requirements (NFRs), thus the acronym NfRn for the technique. NfRn is a graphical notation which is used to specify an interactive system’s global execution context (GEC). The resulting depiction is referred to as the Global Execution Context graph (GECg). The GECg is a visual construction, which consists of nodes, representing interaction scenarios, and directed links representing scenario relationships designating alternate execution, concurrency, ordering, and set-oriented relationships between two scenario nodes. The technique is particularly useful for specifying certain NFRs – such as adaptability, adaptivity, scalability and portability – which are especially relevant for anytime, anywhere access. In the paper, we demonstrate the application of the technique in the context of an on-going research project aiming to build an ‘electronic village’ of local interest in the region of Crete.



 

2001


2001-08: C. Stary, N. Vidakis, “User Interface Design as Knowledge Management” in Proceedings SCI 2001 – World Multiconference on Systemics, Cybernetics and Informatics, Orlando, Vol. XVII, Cybernetics and Informatics: Concepts and Applications (Part II), IIIS (Int. Institute of Infomatics and Systemics), pp. 375-380, Aug. 2001.



 

1997


1997-08: D. Akoumianakis, C. Stephanidis, C. Stary, N. Vidakis, “Task awareness versus task orientation: Comparing two perspectives to user interface design” in HCI International ’97: 7th International Conference on Human Computer Interaction, San Francisco, USA, Aug. 1997, pp. 22.


1997-08: C. Stary, N. Vidakis, S. Mohacsi, and M. Nagelholz, “Workflow-oriented prototyping for the development of interactive software,” in Proceedings Twenty-First Annual International Computer Software and Applications Conference (COMPSAC’97).

Abstract: Nowadays interactive systems cannot be developed in isolation from workflows and the application domains they are embedded in. Unfortunately, a conceptual gap exists between design representations for interactive systems and workflow specifications. This gap leads to a situation in which it can be checked in a very late stage of development whether an interactive system actually fits into a particular workflow or not. If not, redesign is required and the development costs may be increased dramatically. In order to avoid this worst case, the authors introduce a framework and environment that allows the refinement of workflows to system functions at an implementation-independent layer. In addition, TADEUS (Task Analysis/Design/End User Systems) supports workflow driven prototyping. Developing interactive systems this way not only removes the conceptual gap between workflow models and user interface design representations, but also provides early feedback for the developers through the interpretation of the design representations.



 

1996


1996-06: N. Vidakis, C. Stary, “Algorithmic Support for Model Integration in TADEUS” in Proceedings ICCI ’96, International Conference on Computing and Information Jun. 1996.


1996-01: J. Dorn, M. Girsch, N. Vidakis, “DÉJÀ VU: a reusable framework for the construction of intelligent interactive schedulers” in International Conference on Advances in Production Management Systems (APMS’96) Nov. 1996, pp. 467-478.


J. Dorn, M. Girsch, N. Vidakis, “Interaktive Feinplanung im Edelstahlwerk” in BHM-Berg und Huttenmannische Monatshefte, 1996, pp. 393-398.

2015


2015-01: N. Vidakis, E. Christinaki, E. Syntychakis, and G. Triantafyllidis, “Designing a general open authorable digital ecosystem for educational games to support special learning needs”, Virtual Reality technologies for health and clinical applications, Vol.3: Games for rehabilitation, Eds Eva Pettersson Brooks & David Brown, Springer, 2016.

 

Abstract: This chapter presents the design and the architecture of the IOLAOS platform, a general open authorable ecosystem, aiming to increase the effectiveness of serious games for experts (researchers, specialists), carers (teachers, trainers, parents) and users (adults, schoolers, pre-schoolers) of socially, physically or technologically disadvantaged groups. In this context the main ambition of IOLAOS is to introduce the design and the tools for (a) enabling experts (theorists, physiologists, pedagogues, etc.) to codify therapy/recovery styles/limitations and pedagogical methods into game creation guidelines, (b) allowing carers (teachers, trainers, parents etc.) to create educational and/or rehabilitation games based on the experts codified guidelines, curriculum, and user specifics (c) permit users (adults, schooler, preschoolers etc.) to customize, to a certain point, the game according to their preferences and desires and play games alone or in groups with or without carer’s supervision and (d) enable experts or carers to evaluate playing sessions and come to pedagogical and recovery conclusions/decisions. This platform will contribute to domains as diverse as health care and education. As a use case presented in this chapter, IOLAOS is applied for the scenario of teaching preschoolers with autism diagnosis. Children with autism have been reported to exhibit deficits in the recognition of affective expressions and the perception of emotions. In regard to this, the proposed approach with the suggested ecosystem creates a game to support interventions to eliminate such deficits.



 

2009


2009-04: N. Vidakis, D. Kotsalis, G. Milolidakis, G. Vellis, A. Plemenos, E. Robogiannaki, K.Paterakis, D. Akoumianakis, “Cross-organization virtual communities of practices: Supporting virtual partnerships in e-tourism” in D. Akoumianakis (Ed.) ‘Virtual Community Practices and Social Interactive Media: Technology Lifecycle and Workflow Analysis’, IGI Global International, Apr. 2009.



 

1998


J. Dorn, M. Girsch, and N. Vidakis, “DÉJÀ VU — A reusable framework for the construction of intelligent interactive schedulers,” in Advances in Production Management Systems, Springer US, 1998, pp. 467–478.
 
 
Abstract: We describe the techniques of the DÉJÀ VU Scheduling Class Library to achieve a library of reusable and extendible classes for the construction of interactive scheduling systems. The constructed systems shall be efficient and user centered. We describe abstract scheduling objects, constraints between them, and potential user interactions with the system. A first scheduling system was developed for the steel plant of Böhler Kapfenberg. We demonstrate which extensions were necessary and show prototypical examples from the graphical user interface.

Master Thesis (13)

# Thesis Title Author(s) Supervisor Publication Date
1 Serious Game Based on MMO-RPG Iatrou Konstantinos Vidakis N. In Progress
2 A novel serious-games Platform for the study of dementia. Skalidaki Maria Vidakis N. In Progress
3 Environmental monitoring through embedded system and sensors. Lasithiotakis Michail Angelos Vidakis N. In Progress
4 Learning, basic structures, algorithms and data structures in procedural programming with the use of Arduino. The case of programming in the 2nd grade of the vocational high school. Freskakis Dimitrios Vidakis N. 11/01/2019
5 Design and development of user-friendly authoring tool for location based treasure hunts. Charalampakos Orestis Vidakis N. 23/10/2018
6 Enhancing public safety with smart street lighting: Koules walkway case. Ntritsos Roland Vidakis N. 23/10/2018
7 Design and development of effective and customizable serious game platform based on learning profile. Charitakis Stavros Vidakis N. 01/12/2017
8 Natural human-computer interaction applied on serious games using multimodal input devices. Vlasopoulos Anastasios Vidakis N. 13/09/2017
9 Deep learning framework, for image classification applications. Fragiadoulis Alexandros Vidakis N. 23/08/2016
10 Manipulation of internet browser with multimodal devices and introduction of multimodal interactive framework C.O.A.L.S. Varchalamas Petros Vidakis N. 18/07/2016
11 Open-adaptive-authorable platform for educational games. Syntychakis Efthymios Vidakis N. 14/07/2016
12 Coals – A unified framework for multimodal interaction. Kalafatis Konstantinos Vidakis N. 26/02/2016
13 Towards an automatic intelligible monitoring of behavioral and physiological metrics of user experience: head pose estimation and facial expression recognition. Kalliatakis Grιgoriοs Vidakis N. 04/12/2015

Bachelor Thesis (50)

# Thesis Title Author(s) Supervisor Publication Date
1 Educational 3D game for a supermarket Oikonomakis Dimitrios Vidakis N. In Progress
2 Implementation of a serious educational web based game for Java programming tutorial Ntantinakis Nikos Vidakis N. In Progress
3 Design and Implementation of programmable blocks for Java learning Ntamadakis Manolis Vidakis N. In Progress
4 Development of a video game with an indirect aim of educating. Vogiatzakis Sokratis Vidakis N. In Progress
5 Web crawler for serious game data collection Makrodimitrakis Emmanouil Vidakis N. In Progress
6 Common data space for IOLAOS. Verigos Konstantinos Vidakis N. In Progress
7 Game Based Learning: Integrating Users to community Facilities Selekos Petros Vidakis N. In Progress
8 Serious game for power grids. Kontoulis Vasileios, Trampas Apostolos-Marios Vidakis N. 16/02/2018
9 Development of a serious educational game for special education. Barianos Anastasios-Kristofer Vidakis N. 15/02/2018
10 Mass e-mail marketing. Bompetsis Georgios Vidakis N. 04/12/2017
11 On-line quiz generator for educational purposes in JavaEE. Papadopoulou Anna Vidakis N. 18/05/2017
12 Design and development of interactive application for the prevention of Alzheimer’s disease. Kyriakopoulou Marina Vidakis N. 04/05/2017
13 Analysis, design and pilot implementation until serious games for autistic children Kavvalou Maria Vidakis N. 24/06/2016
14 Create an application for smartphones that supports interface with Portals. Panteris Zacharias Vidakis N. 31/05/2016
15 Creating an android application for the organization of financial small enterprises. Stratakis Nikolaos Vidakis N. 19/10/2015
16 Create 3d animation video using muvizu. Ntagli Georgia Vidakis N. 09/10/2015
17 Application development for data entry from NUI Devices in Unity platform. Sfendylis Emmanoui Vidakis N. 07/03/2015
18 Platform of user-computer interface using the Microsoft sensor Kinect. Kontochristos Ilias, Chatzidimitris Nikolaos Vidakis N. 02/03/2015
19 Model-Based Development of modern cooperative games for multiple environments: “The Battleship Game Scenario”. Tsoutsas Georgios, Vigkos Ioannis Vidakis N. 16/01/2015
20 Developing interactive application «invisible percussion» using the Kinect device and programming language Processing. Kontos Christos Vidakis N. 14/01/2015
21 Design and development of a web based application which will provide time and services sharing. Kanakaki Evangelia, Patramani Nikoleta Vidakis N. 16/11/2014
22 Quantitative and qualitative spatial (geographycally) display of solid biomass for the area of Crete with Geographic Information System (GIS). Vakakis Dimitris Vidakis N. 14/09/2014
23 Content management system for reservation and projection of movies in a cinema. Pata Panagiota Vidakis N. 07/09/2014
24 Development of a test automation, which adapts to online store, aiming to optimize the quality of the software. Tzanakis Ioannis Vidakis N. 26/07/2014
25 Point of sale system development. Nouta Valentinos, Nouta Alexandros Vidakis N. 15/06/2014
26 Development of a natural user interface (NUI) and creation of a context information manager, using Microsoft Kinect. Varchalamas Petros Vidakis N. 11/10/2013
27 A gesture/controlled Serious Game for teaching preschoolers with autism facial emotion recognition. Christinaki Eirini Vidakis N. 28/07/2013
28 Navigation and control of a robotic vehicle with action pro live. Skordilis Nikolaos Emmanouil Vidakis N. 08/07/2013
29 Development of a qualifier input control using Microsoft Kinect Sensor. Vlasopoulos Anastasios Vidakis N. 01/07/2013
30 Usability and functionality verification of a database for managing data from courses of the department of applied informatics and multimedia in TEI of Crete, using Reverse Engineering methods. Kammari Stavroula Vidakis N. 07/01/2013
31 HTML5: introduction to HTML5 markup language Valyrakis Georgios, Milolidakis Ioannis Vidakis N. 30/09/2012
32 Virtual communities of practice: Presentation and dissemination of information on the internet using Portals. Markopoulou Maria Vidakis N. 24/09/2012
33 The development of platform conversion dimensional images into sound (3D Image-to-Sound Mapping). Potetsianakis Emmanouil Vidakis N. 03/08/2012
34 Use of computers for distance teaching on secondary education. Vrentzou Aikaterini, Katsiouli Theodora Vidakis N. 13/05/2012
35 Social network web pages support systems. The case of TEI of Heraklion gym. Chatzidimitriou Pavlos Vidakis N. 15/04/2012
36 Web site for the kindergarten of TEI of Crete on Joomla platform. Katrinis Iosif Vidakis N. 09/03/2012
37 InfoGraberCreator, design of a data search on the web software. Zacharioudakis Emmanouil Vidakis N. 01/08/2011
38 Database for managing photographs from the Forestry Directorate of Iraklion. Lenidakis Antonis Vidakis N. 28/01/2011
39 Editor for itnteractive 3D objects. Oikonomakos Panagiotis Vidakis N. 20/09/2010
40 Visual data representation. Lemenitakis Charilaos Vidakis N. 21/03/2010
41 Flash presentation of course syllabus. Droumpakis Pantelis Vidakis N. 09/02/2010
42 Three dimensional e-book presentation. Kattimeri Christina Vidakis N. 01/11/2009
43 Development of ιnteractive 3D objects for data visualization. Vgenopoulos Ioannis Kouletianos Dimitrios Vidakis N. 23/06/2009
44 Registration and evaluation of hourly teachers of the department of applied informatics and multimedia. Chrysos-Glavas Dimitrios, Nikolitsas Aristotelis Vidakis N. 15/05/2009
45 Using interactive objects for designing a 3d building. Stratakis Xenofon Vidakis N. 21/01/2009
46 Agro portal, emphasizing on olive’s harvesting. Vlamakis Georgios, Simantirakis Pantelis Vidakis N. 19/01/2009
47 Webpage for managing and presentation of the athletc center in TEI of Crete. Gioldasis Spyridon Vidakis N. 12/01/2009
48 Electronic managment of a laboratory. Doxastaki Maria, Karnelakis Michail Vidakis N. 21/04/2008
49 Thesaurus managment system SIS-TMS. Kasapakis Nikolaos Vidakis N. 07/03/2008
50 Dynamic map generator. Papasymeou Panagiotis Vidakis N. 29/01/2008

2017

EAI Endorsed Transactions on Creative Technologies

Editor(s)-in-Chief: Matei Mancas and Manik Sharma

Guest Editor(s): Anthony Brooks, Eva Irene Brooks, Nikolas Vidakis and Ben Challis

ArtsIT and DLI 1: Given the accelerated changes and deeply interconnected activities of the times we are living in, creativity is a key factor of disruptive future developments. Creative and entertainment industries nowadays represent more than 3% of the GDP in Europe and they range from creative content providers (TV & radio, fashion, music) through creative experience providers (movies and music experience) to creative services providers (advertising, design, architecture). Creative services, contents and experiences present knowledge requirements that are defined increasingly beyond a single discipline and appear to lie in a sound engagement among the creative practitioner (artist/designer/composer/entertainer), the engineer and the scientist. Digital arts, creative industries, and (tele)communication + (social) signal processing speak the language of convergence rather than autonomy. Their interaction calls for special attention now more than ever.

Publisher EAI    ISSN 2409-9708    Volume 4
Issue10,  Published 4th Sep 2017
Issue11,  Published 5th Sep 2017
Issue12,  Published 3rd Oct 2017
Issue13,  Published 8th Nov 2017


2017

Founder and Scientific Responsible of the NiLE – gamelab (Natural interactive Learning Edification Games Laboratory) of TEI – Crete, https://nile.teicrete.gr/en/home/, Establishment at January 2017


2016

Vidakis N., Guest Editor of the Special Issue EAI Transactions on creative technologies. This special issue will be composed from the extended versions of papers accepted for ArtsIT and DLI 2016 conferences. http://eai.eu/transactions/cfp/artsit-dli-2016

Vidakis N., Technical Program Committee Chair of the 1st EAI International Conference on Design, Learning & Innovation, MAY 2–3, 2016, ESBJERG, DENMARK, http://designlearninginnovation.org/2016/show/home

Vidakis N., Technical Program Committee Chair and Reviewer of the 1st National Education Conference on Society and School: A relationship in Negotiation organized by the Regional Directorate of Primary and Secondary Education of Crete (RDPSEC) http://kritis.pde.sch.gr/ with the collaboration of the Region of Crete, Heraklion Regional Unit and the Municipality of Hersonissos. Under the auspices of the Ministry of Education, Research and Religious. Xersonisos, Crete, 13-15 May 2016 http://kritis.pde.sch.gr/societyandschool1/societyandschool-useful/


2016

2015

2014

Vidakis N., Conference Reviewer of the: International Conference on Telecommunications and Multimedia (TEMU). www.temu.gr/

Vidakis N., Program Committee (PC) Member of the:

2015

S-BPM ONE 2015, the 7th International Conference on Subject-Oriented Business Process Management will take place on April, 23-24, 2015 at the Wirtschaftsakademie Schleswig-Holstein in Kiel, Germany. http://www.s-bpm-one.org/home/previous-conferences/s-bpm-one-2015/

2013

S-BPM ONE 2013, the 5th International Conference on Subject-Oriented Business Process Management. The conference will be held March 11-12, 2013 in Deggendorf, Germany at the University of Applied Sciences Deggendorf. http://www.s-bpm-one.org/home/previous-conferences/s-bpm-one-2013/

2012

S-BPM-ONE 2012, the 4th International Conference on Subject-oriented Business Process Management (http://S-BPM-ONE.org ). The conference will be held April 4-5, 2012 in Vienna at the University of Vienna, Vienna, Austria. https://www.conftool.net/s-bpm-one-2012/

2011

The third S-BPM ONE conference was held in Ingolstadt, Germany at the University of Applied Sciences Ingolstadt on September 29-30, 2011. http://www.s-bpm-one.org/home/previous-conferences/s-bpm-one-2011/


2011

Founder and Scientific Responsible of the NIRTeam (Natural Interaction Research Team) of TEI – Crete, https://blog.teicrete.gr/nirt/, Establishment at December 2011